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45998 No.17566   [Delete]   [Edit

To cross the sea without heaven's knowledge, one had to move openly over the sea but act as if one did not intend to cross it.

>> No.17568   [Delete]   [Edit]

I found another good one in my collection. It's from Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Idols" and even though he speaks about Germany, his words still hold general significance:

5 - What the Germans Need

No one is free any longer in present-day Germany to give their children a noble education: our 'high' schools are without exception geared to the most ambiguous mediocrity, with teachers, teaching plans, teaching objectives. And everywhere an indecent haste prevails, as though something would be missed if the young man of 23 were not yet 'finished', did not yet know the answer to the 'main question': which occupation? - A higher kind of man, if I may be forgiven for saying so, does not like 'occupations', precisely because he knows he has a calling.. He has time, he takes his time, he does not even think of getting 'finished' -- at thirty you are, in the sense of high culture, a beginner, a child.

>> No.17577   [Delete]   [Edit]

I like this one, it's again from Nietzsche (Human, all too Human):

29 - Drunk with the odour of blossoms.

The ship of mankind has, one believes, a deeper and deeper draught the more heavily it is laden; one believes that the more profoundly a man thinks, the more tenderly he feels, the more highly he rates himself, the greater the distance grows between him and the other animals -- the more he appears as the genius among animals -- the closer he will get to the true nature of the world and to a knowledge of it: this he does in fact do through science, but he thinks he does so even more through his arts and religions. These are, to be sure, a blossom of the world, but they are certainly not closer to the roots of the world than the stem is: they provide us with no better understanding of the nature of things at all, although almost everyone believes they do. It is error that has made mankind so profound, tender, inventive as to produce such a flower as the arts and religions. Pure knowledge would have been incapable of it. Anyone who unveiled to us the nature of the world would produce for all of us the most unpleasant disappointment. It is not the world as thing in itself, it is the world as idea (as error) that is so full of significance, profound, marvellous and bearing in its womb all happiness and unhappiness. This consequence leads to a philosophy of logical world-denial: which can, however, be united with a practical world-affirmation just as easily with its opposite.

I find this section fascinating. Sometimes I think Nietzsche was closer to his hated romantic contemporaries than he thought.



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